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Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps
Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps

Australian Indigenous Beeswax Wraps

Vendor
None of Your Beeswax NT
Regular price
$15.00
Sale price
$15.00
Tax included. $9.95 flat rate shipping OR free local pickup!

Beeswax wraps are the all natural alternative to cling wrap that will keep your food fresh for longer. They are washable, reusable and just use the warmth of your hands to seal food directly inside or cover bowls, plates and containers. Great for cheese, bread, fruits and so much more.

Get the perfect mix of shapes and sizes to use in the kitchen to reduce your single plastic use. 

Circles 3 Pack Includes: 1 Medium Circle (25cm) + 2 x Small Circles (20cm)

Lunch 2 Pack Includes: 2 x Medium Square (30cm x 30cm)

Kitchen 3 Pack Includes: 1 Large Rectangle (40cm x 30cm), 1 Medium Square (30cm x 30cm) + 1 Medium Circle (25cm)

Starter 4 Pack Includes: 1 Large Rectangle (40cm x 30cm), 1 Medium Square (30cm x 30cm), 1 Medium Circle (25cm) + 1 Small Circle (20cm)

 

CUSTOM SIZES AVAILABLE - CONTACT US TODAY FOR A QUOTE

 

None of your Beeswax NT's wraps are made with 100% cotton infused with our secret mix of Australian Beeswax, Pine Resin + Jojoba Oil (All products are natural and help with anti bacterial properties)

Colours may appear different in person due to lighting/photo quality

 

ARTWORK AND ARTIST:

1. The place depicted in this painting, Ngama, is located south of Yuendumu in the Northern Territory. This Dreaming belongs to Nakamarra/Napurrurla women and Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This story describes the journey of Yarripiri, an ancestral 'warna' (snake). He travelled from Wirnparrku near Mt. Liebig to Yimparlu, and continued its way through the territories of Ngapanangka-jarra, Warlajirryi, Kurnmundu, Yinyirrinyi on to Ngama. Later Yarripiri travelled further north via Mijirlparnta (Mission Creek) and right through to the top end of Australia. Yarripiri was very sad as his family had left him behind at Wirnparrku. He was blind and crippled, but he was determined to follow and search them out. He had to be carried. This was the job undertaken by the 'kurdungurlu'(ceremonial police) of the Dreaming: the Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Where Yarripiri's tail slumped and touched the ground creeks were formed, such as Mijirlparnta, west of Yuendumu. Yarripiri tracks and paths are often represented by arc shapes or curved lines depicted across the canvas.
Artist: Sharoline Nampijinpa Frank

 

2. An old man, 'lungkarda', of the Jampijinpa skin group, lived on a hill with his two Jangala sons. The old man would claim blindness and send his two boys out to hunt, while gone the old man would go and hunt and eat everything he found. One day his two sons hunted a Kangaroo after extensive tracking. Upon return they were told this Kangaroo was sacred to the 'lungkarda', this angered the old man terribly. The next time the boys went out the old man put his fire sticks to the ground, unleashing a relentless bush fire that chased them across the lands. Exhausted, the boys managed to outrun the flames, only to be consumed by the fire when it reappeared out of the blue-tongued lizard hole.

Artist: Lynette Nampijinpa Granites

 

3. The place depicted in this painting, Ngama, is located south of Yuendumu in the Northern Territory. This Dreaming belongs to Nakamarra/Napurrurla women and Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This story describes the journey of Yarripiri, an ancestral 'warna' (snake). He travelled from Wirnparrku near Mt. Liebig to Yimparlu, and continued its way through the territories of Ngapanangka-jarra, Warlajirryi, Kurnmundu, Yinyirrinyi on to Ngama. Later Yarripiri travelled further north via Mijirlparnta (Mission Creek) and right through to the top end of Australia. Yarripiri was very sad as his family had left him behind at Wirnparrku. He was blind and crippled, but he was determined to follow and search them out. He had to be carried. This was the job undertaken by the 'kurdungurlu'(ceremonial police) of the Dreaming: the Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Where Yarripiri's tail slumped and touched the ground creeks were formed, such as Mijirlparnta, west of Yuendumu. Yarripiri tracks and paths are often represented by arc shapes or curved lines depicted across the canvas.
Artist: Sharoline Nampijinpa Frank

 

4. The Warlawurru Jukurrpa (wedge-tailed eagle dreaming) belongs to two places called Wakurlpa and Yuwarli, both to the north of Yuendumu. At Yuwarli, the site which is shown here, a Warlawurru made a ‘mina’ (nest) in a tree and laid two ‘ngipiri’ (eggs). From this place the ‘warlawurru’ would fly around searching for prey, up to the size of young kangaroos and emus. ‘Warlawurru’ would also travel to Ngatirri, near Purturlu, looking for food. The custodians for the Warlawurru Jukurrpa are Japaljarri/Jungarrayi men and Napaljarri/Nungarrayi women. This Jukurrpa is an important part of the initiation ceremonies for young men of the Japaljarri and Jungarrayi subsection. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. In paintings depicting this Dreaming, ‘warlawurru’ nests are typically represented by concentric circles and their ‘ngipiri’ and ‘wirliya’ (tracks) are often shown as graphic representations of those elements.
Artist: Glorine Nungarrayi Martin